Security forces honor fallen member

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- Dac, a military working with the 460th Security Forces Squadron, poses for a photo to be used on military working dog trading cards. Members of the 460th SFS held a memorial for Dac April 27 at the Base Chapel. Dac was put to sleep Feb. 24 at the Fort Carson Veterinary Clinic due to a deteriorating medical condition. About 75 people attended the ceremony, including memebers of the Aurora and Denver police departments, Department of Homeland Security, Peterson Air Force Base, the U.S. Air Force Academy and Fort Carson. Dac, a German Shephard, was accepted into the K-9 program June 13, 2000, and served here from April 2001 until his passing. (Courtesy photo)

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- Dac, a military working with the 460th Security Forces Squadron, poses for a photo to be used on military working dog trading cards. Members of the 460th SFS held a memorial for Dac April 27 at the Base Chapel. Dac was put to sleep Feb. 24 at the Fort Carson Veterinary Clinic due to a deteriorating medical condition. About 75 people attended the ceremony, including memebers of the Aurora and Denver police departments, Department of Homeland Security, Peterson Air Force Base, the U.S. Air Force Academy and Fort Carson. Dac, a German Shephard, was accepted into the K-9 program June 13, 2000, and served here from April 2001 until his passing. (Courtesy photo)

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- Senior Airman Tasia Trombley, 460th Security Forces Squadron military working dog handler, speaks at the memorial for Dac, her military working dog for about a year, April 27 at the Base Chapel. Dac was put to sleep Feb. 24 at the Fort Carson Veterinary Clinic due to a deteriorating medical condition. About 75 people attended the ceremony, including memebers of the Aurora and Denver police departments, Department of Homeland Security, Peterson Air Force Base, the U.S. Air Force Academy and Fort Carson. Dac, a German Shephard, was accepted into the K-9 program June 13, 2000, and served here from April 2001 until his passing. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Logan Tuttle)

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- Senior Airman Tasia Trombley, 460th Security Forces Squadron military working dog handler, speaks at the memorial for Dac, her military working dog for about a year, April 27 at the Base Chapel. Dac was put to sleep Feb. 24 at the Fort Carson Veterinary Clinic due to a deteriorating medical condition. About 75 people attended the ceremony, including memebers of the Aurora and Denver police departments, Department of Homeland Security, Peterson Air Force Base, the U.S. Air Force Academy and Fort Carson. Dac, a German Shephard, was accepted into the K-9 program June 13, 2000, and served here from April 2001 until his passing. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Logan Tuttle)

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- Members of the 460th Security Forces Squadron built a missing dog display at a memorial ceremony April 27 at the Base Chapel for Dac, a military working dog here. Dac was put to sleep Feb. 24 at the Fort Carson Veterinary Clinic due to a deteriorating medical condition. According to Tech. Sgt. Christopher Roach, the 460th SFS Military Working Dog Section noncommissioned officer in charge, the missing dog display is representative of the bond between dog and handler. The leather leash and chain hanging from the kennel represent the everlasting eternal bond between dog and handler. The empty kennel where the military working dog once slept represents the life that they gave to protect us, our brothers and sisters, and our freedom.  The inverted bucket reminds us that they are no longer here for us to fulfill their needs of food and water for which in life they asked for no more in return than our companionship and affection. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Logan Tuttle)

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- Members of the 460th Security Forces Squadron built a missing dog display at a memorial ceremony April 27 at the Base Chapel for Dac, a military working dog here. Dac was put to sleep Feb. 24 at the Fort Carson Veterinary Clinic due to a deteriorating medical condition. According to Tech. Sgt. Christopher Roach, the 460th SFS Military Working Dog Section noncommissioned officer in charge, the missing dog display is representative of the bond between dog and handler. The leather leash and chain hanging from the kennel represent the everlasting eternal bond between dog and handler. The empty kennel where the military working dog once slept represents the life that they gave to protect us, our brothers and sisters, and our freedom. The inverted bucket reminds us that they are no longer here for us to fulfill their needs of food and water for which in life they asked for no more in return than our companionship and affection. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Logan Tuttle)